Depression and Insomnia

By | April 8, 2016

A systems pattern of recovery from comorbid chronic disease through immune competency is currently seen best in a regular subjective reporting process. Because standard of care for depression and insomnia also rely on self-reporting and these comorbidities are already well identified as occuring together in the literature,[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] the data below were selected from the cohort to describe immune competency recovery.

Varied progression is expected between individuals, gender, and palliation or not because each individual works to restore the competency of their own full-system immune infrastructure during the recovery process. Important patterns describing recovery of immune competency through immune stimulation are beginning to emerge in the data. These include typical hill and valley oscillation, gender-related dominance of insomnia or depression, and useful palliation insights (possible introduction of immune suppression, typically higher depression is reported over non-palliated recovery).

Two charts also include objective marker data for Metabolic Syndrome comorbidity with insomnia and depression, with objective marker time relationship indicated on the subjective report timeline.

It is important to note there were no suicides in the depression cohort.

NPPPA gathered objective markers to help bridge expected objective data practices into early full-system immune competency recovery evidence of advanced comorbidities. Objective data were gathered from intake point to recovery or when self-reports abandoned mention of symptoms. This review of objective markers to help describe recovery end points and better define advanced processes and treatment options, along with regular subjective reporting, may be useful to design additional studies with refined marker use and development within the complex systems data challenge of enabling immune competency for recovery.

Click individual charts for enlarged detail.

OLMESARTAN MEDOXOMIL ONLY
Female

Not Palliated, non-palliated comorbid depression and insomnia and Metabolic Syndrome subclinical recovery

Not Palliated, non-palliated comorbid depression and insomnia and Metabolic Syndrome subclinical recovery

Not Palliated, non-palliated comorbid depression and insomnia recovery

Not Palliated, non-palliated comorbid depression and insomnia recovery

OLMESARTAN MEDOXOMIL WITH PALLIATION
Female

2016-13_P-CoDeprInsom_F

2016-09_P-CoDeprInsom_F

OLMESARTAN MEDOXOMIL ONLY
Male

Not Palliated, non-palliated comorbid depression and insomnia recovery

Not Palliated, non-palliated comorbid depression and insomnia recovery

OLMESARTAN MEDOXOMIL WITH PALLIATION
Male

2016-49_P-CoDeprInsom_M


[1] Lena Mallon, Jan-Erik Broman and Jerker Hetta (2000). Relationship Between Insomnia, Depression, and Mortality: A 12-Year Follow-Up of Older Adults in the Community. International Psychogeriatrics, 12, pp 295-306. doi:10.1017/S1041610200006414.

[2] Roth, T. (2007). “Insomnia: Definition, prevalence, etiology, and consequences”. Journal of  clinical sleep medicine : JCSM : official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine 3 (5 Suppl): S7–10. PMC 1978319. PMID 17824495.

[3] Luca, A; Luca, M; Calandra, C (2013). “Sleep disorders and depression: brief review of the literature, case report, and nonpharmacologic interventions for depression.” Clinical interventions in aging 8: 1033–9. doi:10.2147/CIA.S47230. PMID 24019746.

[4] “Several Sleep Disorders Reflect Gender Differences”. Psychiatric News 42 (8): 40. 2007. http://psychnews.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176%2Fpn.42.10.0040 a

[5] Merrigan, Jill M.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Bird, Joshua C. and Livingston, Edward H. (2013). “Insomnia”. JAMA 309 (7): 733. doi:10.1001/jama.2013.524. PMID 23423421

[6] Wilson, S.; Nutt, D.; Alford, C.; Argyropoulos, S.; Baldwin, D.; Bateson, A.; Britton, T.;
Crowe, C.; Dijk, D. -J.; Espie, C.; Gringras, P.; Hajak, G.; Idzikowski, C.; Krystal, A.; Nash, J.; Selsick, H.; Sharpley, A.; Wade, A. (2010). “British Association for Psychopharmacology consensus statement on evidence-based treatment of insomnia, parasomnias  and circadian rhythm disorders”. Journal of Psychopharmacology 24 (11): 1577–1601. doi:10.1177/0269881110379307. PMID 20813762.